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How do the PSAT and SAT Reasoning Test differ?

November 5, 2011 by yelisha6518 · No Comments · Uncategorized

The PSAT is also called the Practice SAT I. How do the SAT Reasoning Test and PSAT differ? Is it just merely practice for the SAT/SAT I/SAT Reasoning Test? Are there circumstances such that a student should prepare for it? What are the resemblances? How are they different? Are they very dissimilar? What is the significance of the PSAT? What is the best way to prep for it? What is the significance of the PSAT? This brief article will answer these issues.

The SAT I scores are seen by the colleges. By contrast, the PSAT score is not seen by the colleges.|The SAT Reasoning Test scores are considered by the universities. However, the PSAT score is not noted by the universities. The PSAT does not have the higher level math problems and essay of the SAT I.

PSAT scores range from 20-80, whereas SAT Reasoning Test scores range from 200-800. PSAT scores can be multiplied by 10 to compute the corresponding SAT Reasoning Test score. {The PSAT does not have the higher level math problems and essay of the SAT Reasoning Test.

There are a few differences in structure. The PSAT is shorter than the SAT I. The PSAT incorporates a verbal “error recognition” section (a 30 minute multiple choice section that appears at the end) notincorporated in the SAT Reasoning Test.

Rising juniors should worry about the PSAT in the following situations only:
* They are in a realistic range of National Merit recognition. Students can be commended by having a score of about 200 or more, depending upon the year and state. Students will become semi-finalists if they are within the top 1% in their state. Cut offs differ state by state. They have been about 218 in CT and additionally NY.
* They are in a realistic range of National Achievement (African-American) or National Hispanic scholarships, also associated with the PSAT and generally with slightly lower cut-offs.
* They need to take the PSAT for school tracking.
* They need to take the PSAT for self-esteem.

Only rising juniors will qualify for the National Merit Scholarship Competition as determined by the PSAT. Consequently, rising sophomores will need to worry about the PSAT in the following situations only:
* they need a good score for self-esteem
* they desire it for some school tracking

The PSAT is NOT worthwhile as a practice SAT Reasoning Test, due to the fact that the PSAT lacks the more advanced math problems, essay and additionally the length of the SAT. Also, the PSAT features a verbal “error recognition” section (a 30 minute multiple choice section that appears at the end) that isn’t included in the SAT I. Last but not least, the PSAT is in addition inconvenient considering scores aren’t released until late December or maybe later.

For a lot of students, the PSAT is inessential. Nevertheless, if you belong to one or more of the four categories above and can use some of our help, we are in a position to provide a capable tutor to help the student prep for the PSAT. Our practice sessions for the SAT I offer a better snapshot score. Also, the student gets IMMEDIATE feedback.

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